Hearing test: Can you hear like a teenager?

Take a listen to this audio clip. Be Careful, the sound (if you can hear like a teenager) is loud and annoying (it’s not called a mosquito ringtone for nothing). You may want to turn down your computer speakers and turn up gradually to test a comfortable sound level.

Mosquito Ringtone – Can you Hear Like a Teenager?

[audio:http://www.noiseaddicts.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/test_tone_teenager.mp3|titles=audio]

What do you hear? If you don’t hear anything, you’re not alone. You’re probably over the age of 25. If you can hear it, then you likely find it fairly annoying.

As we age, the little hairs in our inner ear lose some of their function and we begin to lose our hearing in the very high frequency ranges. Tones like the one above are sometimes used by teens for their cell phone ring tones so their teachers can’t hear their phone ringing in class (where cell phones are usually banned). The teacher, who is likely older than 25, has some degree of hearing loss and is oblivious to the ring.

Another ingenious use of this concept comes in a $1500 package called the “Mosquito”, which is an anti-teen loitering device. The device is placed wherever teen loitering is unwanted, with the idea being that teens will find it so annoying that they’ll go somewhere else. Adults, on the other hand are not bothered by the tone because they can’t hear it.

In any case, if you can’t hear the tone, don’t feel bad – it just means you’re getting wiser.

rightIf you liked this article, please check out our High Frequency Hearing Test to see just how high your hearing actually goes.

This content was originally published here.

VIDEO shows deaf child react to Syrian first lady giving him life-changing hearing aid — RT World News

VIDEO shows deaf child react to Syrian first lady giving him life-changing hearing aid

Asma, who is the wife of Syrian President Bashar Assad, was filmed paying a charity visit to the Damascus hospital Monday where she met families whose children suffer from hearing impairments.

The video, uploaded by the Syrian presidency’s official Twitter account, shows Asma equipping a young boy with a hearing implant. The child, who was born deaf, begins to laugh and offers thumbs up as he hears human voices clearly for the first time in his life while Asma talks to him gently. In all, ten children received the device with the first lady’s support.

شاهد..
أول لحظة تواصل مع العالم الخارجي..
أول صوت يسمعه الطفل حسين الناصر..
أول خطوة في طريق جديد..
وتتويج لجهود كبيرة ولأياد كثيرة.. اجتمعت كلها ليسمع هؤلاء الأطفال أول صوت في عالمهم الذي نتمنى أن يكون مليئا بالسعادة والنجاح والتطور.. pic.twitter.com/h0P90BJJFU

— Syrian Presidency (@Presidency_Sy)

The footage has been widely shared on social networks, with many praising the first lady for her charity work. A post on Asma’s Instagram page has highlighted the rehab program for children who suffer from life-long hearing impairments.

A post shared by The First Lady Asma al Assad (@asmaalassad) on

The Syrian first lady herself has recently been in need of medical help after she was diagnosed with breast cancer in August 2018. This did not stop her from continuing her charity and humanitarian projects helping Syrian people overcome the aftermath of the war that has been devastating the country since 2011.

Beautiful.
Despite the cancer treatments, Syria’s First Lady Asma Al Assad has never stopped the community work in Syria.
The video shows the child Hussein Nasser’s adorable reaction when he was finally able to hear after he was given his first hearing aidpic.twitter.com/A2ADHMBNpP

— هادي نصرالله (@HadiNasrallah)

Asma Assad was born to Syrian parents in London, educated in the UK and moved to Syria in November 2000 shortly after meeting Bashar Assad, whom she married a month later. The couple has three children. Asma is known to have refused multiple offers of asylum, choosing to stay in war-torn Syria.

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© Autonomous Nonprofit Organization “TV-Novosti”, 2005–2019. All rights reserved.

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Frank Starkey: Renaissance man with a vision for downtown New Port Richey

There’s a recipe for fueling an urban renaissance, and real estate developer Frank Starkey is betting the city of New Port Richey has the ingredients. He is backing it up with a big investment in three downtown projects.

“New Port Richey has the bones in place. It has the synergy and structure to allow anything to happen,” said Starkey, 48, an avid advocate of new urbanism.

The city is in a prime location, he points out, nestled along the Pithlachascotee River, which winds through the James E. Grey Preserve, by the newly renovated Sims Park and into the Gulf of Mexico. There’s a walkable grid, a quaint downtown and picturesque Orange Lake. Even the shabby outskirts and empty storefronts have appeal, according to Starkey, because, “Every urban redevelopment story starts out that way.”

Add to that a storied history.

Golfing great Gene Sarazan invented the modern sand wedge here in 1931 and designed a golf course along the banks of the Pithlachascotee. Silent film star Thomas Meighan fostered a notion to develop the “Hollywood of the East” during the 1920s in New Port Richey, giving rise to two crown jewels of the jazz age — the Hacienda Hotel and the Meighan Theatre, now Richey Suncoast Theatre. That hopeful era fizzled with the Great Depression.

There is a growing sense the tide is turning. And Starkey, fueled by a residential trend toward walkable communities and a supportive City Council, is diving in.

His premier effort, with financial partner Jim Goodchild, is “The Central,” an upscale, 85-unit apartment complex meant to appeal to empty-nester baby boomers and millennials with incomes of $50,000 or more. The $10 million project, slated to break ground this fall, calls for a series of mansion-like buildings to be built on Circle Boulevard, on the east side of Orange Lake on property the New Port Richey Community Redevelopment Agency purchased for $3.1 million in 2005. Plans to develop the former site of First Baptist Church never materialized until Starkey brought his proposal to the City Council.

Starkey also partnered with designer Jose Cardenas to refurbish a 9,600-square-foot retail space at 5800 Main St. Wright’s Natural Market, a 23-year-old mom-and-pop business currently on U.S. 19, will be the anchor tenant. Other expected businesses will include a jewelry store, a music store and a microbrewery.

“One of our goals is to revitalize active retail on Main Street,” Starkey said. “It helps to prime the pump and is mutually supportive of (The Central).”

Starkey is also the financial backer for a duplex renovation project on Florida Avenue undertaken by Andy Mikulski, a project manager at People Places LLC, and Lia Gallegos of Rock the Boat Productions, an event company Starkey uses.

That project is over budget, largely because the house had not been updated since it was built in 1947, said Mikulski, “and because Frank insists on doing it right.”

Starkey chalks it up as a learning experience — one that aligns with his belief that locals with modest means and developers like himself can be part of authentic urban redevelopment, similar to what has taken place in Seminole Heights in Tampa, Dunedin, Largo and Safety Harbor.

“On the map, they are tiny, little dots,” he said. “New Port Richey is one of those dots that has had some degree of renaissance.”

Things have been happening.

The redevelopment of Sims Park has brought steady traffic to the city. Improvements to the adjacent Hacienda Hotel are chugging along. Construction is under way again at Main Street Landing, a promised blend of retail and residential space that stalled to the dismay of many during the economic downturn of 2007. It is now projected to open next summer.

Downtown stalwarts have been joined by newer endeavors such as Sugar Darlings cupcake store, Ottaway’s Parkside Ice Cream Parlor, the White Heron Tea Room, Sip Wine Bar, Beef ‘O’ Brady’s, the Gateway Gallery and Emporium and a technology company called MyNetworkOne.

“I feel like we’re in the center of an upper renaissance in the New Port Richey area,” said Lisa Bolster, who owns Sip with her husband, Kris. “The architecture is what stole our hearts. But the promise that the city showed with the new park, and projects like Frank’s, gave us the reassurance to come here.”

Businesses are driven to the city by a growing residential base, said city economic development director Mario Iezzoni.

“They see these other cities and how their urban cores have developed. People must be there to support the businesses,” Iezzoni said. “That’s why Frank’s vision is so important. That’s why his projects are so important.”

Jeff and Kathy Wright are moving their natural food store downtown, lured in part by the location, the promise of new residents and a $250,000 commercial real estate development grant from the city, split between Starkey ($150,000) and the Wrights ($100,000).

“I think the new location will make it easier for people to find us, but I’m still a little nervous,” said Jeff Wright, who hopes to open before the winter holidays. “We are taking a big step of faith. The city is taking a big step of faith. And Frank and his partners are taking a big step of faith. We are all in it. It’s sort of sink or swim.”

City Council members who support The Central, as well as Main Street Landing, point to a 2015 study conducted by Zimmerman Volk, a marketing strategy firm in New Jersey.

Among the findings: a need for an additional 500 residential units to support local businesses, with 375 of those being rentals.

“The Zimmerman Volk study was a real eye opener. Once we saw that, (Starkey) had the green light,” said Deputy Mayor Jeff Starkey, who is no relation to Frank Starkey. “Once it’s done, it’s a real game changer. We’re going to turn this to more of a walkable community where you can get out of your car and you won’t need your car till you leave downtown. I think it’s the way to go.”

“There are going to be a bunch of changes that are going to happen, and Frank’s getting out in front of it,” said Mayor Rob Marlowe, who predicts a waiting list of apartment applicants.

The site of the old Community Hospital in New Port Richey is one of 14 locations being considered for a VA outpatient clinic, Marlowe noted, adding that employees of the clinic might want to live nearby.

“We’re going to make this place a wonderful place to live,” Marlowe said. “Frank is a visionary when it comes to that, and I think what he’s reading in the tea leaves might be spot on.”

Among residents, opinions vary on the projects.

The vision appeals to Annie Roesler and her husband, Brian, both 30. They grew up in New Port Richey, left for college, and now rent a house in downtown for $800 a month.

“We were able to find something nicer, but most rentals are kind of rundown — kind of sad,” said Annie Roesler, who telecommutes for an educational technology company in Boston. “I like the idea of having more nice housing with character, the ability to live in downtown and walk to places. I cannot afford to buy a house right now, but I would like to live somewhere nice.”

While excited about the prospect of a nearby grocery store, neighbors Rex Phelps and Jennifer Melton, who own homes on Central Avenue, behind where the apartments will be built, aren’t enthused about The Central. The primary concern: parking.

Plans call for 97 on-site spaces for Central residents. There will be 49 public street parking spaces available, of which 16 are new, according to Starkey.

“That’s not enough,” said Melton. “Eighty-five units times two people, that’s 170 people.”

Apartments dwellers will take street parking spaces that current residents use, Melton said. It will strain the city’s infrastructure. Construction will be disruptive. The buildings are too tall. She will lose her view of the lake.

Phelps, who purchased his house for the front porch, thinks local demographics won’t support rents expected to start at $1,100 a month. The bull market could plummet. The upscale apartments could turn into low-income housing. And there’s enough of that already, he said.

That won’t happen, Starkey said. The first phase of The Central will start with 23 apartments, allowing investors to regroup if rentals don’t move. Presently, parking is only a problem during special events, he said, and the city is reviewing sites for a parking garage to help deal with that. Car-to-go services like Uber and Lyft are changing the need to own a car, and driverless cars are on the horizon, he added.

“We don’t have good public transportation here,” he said. “People buy cars. People like their cars, and if you don’t believe that you need to talk to the guy at Friendly Kia.”

Even so, he said, “I’m not against what (Starkey) is doing. I think what he’s doing is great as long as it gets done right. There’s the trick. The devil is in the details.”

Starkey’s name carries weight. But so, he figures, should his reputation.

His grandfather was cattle rancher Jay B. Starkey. His grandmother was Blanche M. Straub, daughter of William Straub, a former publisher of the St. Petersburg Times. His parents, Jay B. Starkey Jr., and Marsha (Miller) Starkey, raised four children on the family’s Pasco ranch, bordering a park named for their grandfather.

“My dad was more motivated by stature than status. Grandad was the same way,” he said. “He was concerned with leading with character.”

Starkey attended Gulf High, Gulf Junior High and Elfers Elementary when Mittye P. Locke, for whom the school was later named, was principal. His family shopped at the IGA Potter Brothers grocery store, on the Main Street site he is redeveloping.

He studied architecture at Rice University and cut his teeth developing the upscale Longleaf community in Trinity with his brother, Trey, who raises blueberries and is married to county Commissioner Kathryn Starkey.

He served on the Rollins College Masters of Planning in Civic Urbanism Advisory Board. He is a past president of the National Town Builders Association, former chairman of the Seaside Institute and was the first developer in residence at the University of Miami’s Masters in Real Estate + Urbanism program.

When the family sold its 2,300-acre ranch for $54 million in 2013, Starkey went looking for projects. He honed in on his hometown.

In 2015, he moved his business, People Places LLC, from the home he shares with his husband in Trinity to Main Street in New Port Richey. Soon after that, he began hosting “Talk About Town” public forums to educate and encourage dialogue, with a focus on urban development and his local projects. Other topics included human trafficking, the local music scene, the work of the Humane Society and the advent of medical marijuana.

While currently invested in an urban redevelopment project in Winter Garden and a vacation property in Wilton Manors in South Florida, Starkey figures 90 percent of his business is wrapped up in New Port Richey.

“Our desire is for New Port Richey to do well. The challenge is to grow in a way that is appropriate, that takes it to the next level in a way that will not overwhelm it — does not push it beyond what the current fabric would support,” he said, noting that Manhattan in New York City was once farmland and that cows used to graze around New Port Richey’s Orange Lake.

“The long view is that the way a place is built initially — it doesn’t stay that way. That’s what’s cool about cities. They have multiple lives.”

Contact Michele Miller at mmiller@tampabay.com. Follow @MicheleMiller52.

Frank Starkey: Renaissance man with a vision for downtown New Port Richey 10/05/17 [Last modified: Thursday, October 5, 2017 11:44am]
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Illiopolis boy helps push bill to cover hearing aids for kids

Traversing party lines, a young Sangamon County boy and his younger brother took on the Illinois legislature this year and garnered massive support for a bill to help get stronger insurance coverage for children with hearing loss.

“I started trying to figure out what we could do to get it covered, and nobody would listen to me because I’m just a mom,” said Ramona Martin, the boys’ mother. “When (Hunter) turned 7, he started speaking up.”

Hunter and Owen Martin, ages 10 and 7, respectively, both wear hearing aids. They live with their parents in Illiopolis, along with Hunter’s twin sister, Hannah, and Owen’s twin brother, Noah.

Life is going well for the family. Hunter is enthusiastic about school, but the hearing aids he and his brother wear can sometimes create hurdles for the family.

The devices can cost upward of $4,000 and need to be replaced faster as the boys grow up.

Both Ramona and her husband, Andrew, work in education — she’s a social worker at Douglas School in Springfield, and he’s a history teacher at Sangamon Valley Middle School in Illiopolis — and have good insurance. But their plans do not cover most hearing aids.

Hunter’s advocacy was spurred on when he lost one of his hearing aids in school. It was his first time living without one, and he found it exhausting. It took two weeks for a replacement.

“It was rough,” said Hunter. “It’s like putting your fingers in your ears or cotton balls in your ears and then leaving it in 24/7.”

It was exhausting to strain to hear in class, so much so he would come home and nap after school, his mother said.

Last year, he started to attend Illinois House and Senate insurance committee meetings, speaking out why hearing aids should be covered.

“At my first one I was a little nervous, but other than that, I was just fine,” Hunter said.

The bill in 2017 failed, but things perked up in 2018 with House Bill 4516, which requires insurance companies to cover the replacement of hearing aids every three years for children under 18. In February and May, Hunter sat in both chambers’ insurance committees, garnering bipartisan support for the bill.

“Hunter provided really what is firsthand experience of what it’s like to be a child and not able to hear, and how important it was for him to be able to have a hearing aid,” said Sen. Julie Morrison, D-Deerfield, who sponsored the bill in the Senate. “Whether it was to hear a teacher a classmate, being able socialize or just being able to be a normal kid.”

Ramona said her son didn’t need to ask her for help while legislators grilled him with questions.

“This time I went up by myself,” said Hunter. “I was like, ‘Mom, I need you to stay back, I got this.'”

Both chambers were nearly unanimous in their support for the bill, which now sits on Gov. Bruce Rauner’s desk for his signature or veto. The Martins are pushing for people to email Rauner to urge him to sign it.

Despite the strong support among lawmakers, a number of private insurance companies have spoke out against the bill. Hunter says he isn’t afraid of them.

“We’ll get through it somehow,” he said.

The whole process has left Hunter enamored with government.

Part of his interest came from the last day of the legislative session, when he worked as a page for Morrison.

“I just thought he was such an amazing young man. I said, ‘You should come back and be my page one day,’” said Morrison. “I got to introduce him to half the senators on the floor and encouraged him to continue in public policy and told him, ‘You know what, you should run for office someday.’”

When he grows up, Hunter said he wants to join the Army and study politics and law, eventually becoming a lawyer and a senator.

“Whenever I get done with high school, I’m going to enlist in the Army and then head to school,” he said.

In the more immediate future, he wants to support bills that go further strengthen hearing aid insurance coverage, such as extending the coverage to adults and shortening the intervals between getting a new hearing aid.

“Let’s do one thing at a time,” his mother said.

“I know but, it’s gotta get passed,” he retorted. “Well, eventually it’ll get passed.”

Contact Maximilian Kwiatkowski: 788-1530, mkwiatkowski@sj-r.com, twitter.com/MSFKwiat.

This content was originally published here.

Deaf Baby Boy Hears Family for Very First Time Thanks to Hearing Aids

Developments in modern medicine and technology have combined in ever-more-impressive ways. Yesterday’s science fiction is today’s reality.

We have devices now that would blow people’s minds just a hundred years ago. We’ve made so many advances that have drastically altered our day-to-day lives, for better and for worse.

But one family is basking in the fullness medicine and technology has brought to their youngest son.

Asher was born deaf. He’s never had the opportunity to hear most of the things that babies hear — both before and after being born.

His mother could sing, but he’d only see her lips move soundlessly. His dad could cheer him on and say hello, but it was only motion.

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His brothers would interact with him, but their howls and childlike shouts were muted. The world was not entirely accessible to Asher, and during such a crucial time in his growth.

After finding out he was deaf, his parents made arrangements to get him hearing aids. You’ve no doubt seen some of the videos of young children getting fitted with the device and realizing what they’ve been missing the whole time.

This particular video shows Asher taking in a whole new angle of reality. He can hardly seem to deal with the amount of information he can now process.

The little family is packed into a small room, most likely at the doctor’s since you can see the doctor off to the side in a swivel chair.

As the woman who is presumably his mum holds him up, he swivels his head back and forth, quickly for such a small child. You can see him tracking sounds, and how he’s soaking it all in.

Dad’s voice talks to him from above, and Asher can finally hear his name being spoken to him.

He smiles readily but is so intent on hearing everything that he barely has time to smile before turning to see where another sound is. And there’s sound all around him!

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Mom, dad, and two young brothers all smother him with attention. He can’t decide who to focus on.

“Look at him! He never moves his head this much,” said mom.

Online, the parents shared their joy during those moments: “He smiled from ear to ear when he first hears his daddy’s voice. His big brothers came to witness the miracle, they were so happy. It was a beautiful moment for us as a family.”

A beautiful moment to share with the world, too. A rare moment caught for us to enjoy, as well — welcome to the world of sound, baby Asher!

Wondering where the comments are?We encourage you to use the share buttons below and start the conversation on your own!

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Baby Hears Mom For The First Time After Receiving Hearing Aids, And Her Reaction Will Melt Your Heart

Baby Hears Mom For The First Time After Receiving Hearing Aids, And Her Reaction Will Melt Your Heart

Charly, a beautiful daughter of Christy Keane, was born in August 2017. Sadly, the girl came into this world profoundly deaf. Determined parents have been restfully working on a solution since then and they were finally able to get little baby Charlotte hearing aids. And the moment she hears her mother saying “Hi” for the first time, her face lights up with happiness!

Her mother Christy made sure this magical moment stays in their lives forever by recording it. Although Charly is still an infant, you can see how fast she gets really emotional and tries to hold back tears of joy in her eyes. The moment Christy says “I love you”, you can see Charly tearing up again.

“We had our miracle moment that I have been praying for when Char got her hearing aids today. We didn’t think she would hear anything so this was more incredible than I can put in to words. Her journey to implants and language development is off to an amazing start,” Christy Keane wrote on her Instagram.

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Hearing Aid Batteries | Size 675 Batteries | Microbattery

Let Microbattery.com be your one-stop-shop for zinc air batteries! We offer a huge selection of the world’s leading hearing aid battery manufacturers in all sizes, including size 675 and high power 675HP / cochlear batteries: Energizer, Duracell, iCellTech, NEXcell, Panasonic, Power One, Rayovac, Renata, Sony, Toshiba, and ZeniPower. We have them all! Mercury free hearing aid battery formulations are available with several of these brands.
We offer same day shipping, fresh stock, and the lowest prices. Guaranteed.
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675A, 675AE, 675DS, 675HP, 675HPX, 675SA, 675UP A675, AC675, AC675E, AC675EZ B6754, B900PA DA675H, DA675N L675ZA ME9Z PR44, P675, PR675 R675ZA S675A V675, V675HP W675ZA ZA675
Order a box of batteries and receive a free   keychain battery holder !

Global Adult Hearing Aids Market 2018 – Widex, GN ReSound, William Demant, Sivantos, Sonova and Starkey

The prime focus of Global Adult Hearing Aids Market 2018 is to gather important factors inhibiting the growth of Adult Hearing Aids industry. It also commits to target tendencies of Adult Hearing Aids industry in order to adopt strategies favourable for business and market growth. Analyzing future Adult Hearing Aids Business insights is completely based on the current Adult Hearing Aids business scenario, business approaches, and market demands chosen by the manufacturers of Adult Hearing Aids market. Adult Hearing Aids market is isolated based on key players, product types, applications and geographical regions.

Bisecting global Adult Hearing Aids Industry: 

Adult Hearing Aids market distribution based on manufacturers: Widex, GN ReSound, William Demant, Sivantos, Sonova and Starkey
Adult Hearing Aids Industry distribution based on geographical zones: North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India

To access free sample pages of Global Adult Hearing Aids Industry 2018 Market Research Report, click here: https://market.biz/report/global-adult-hearing-aids-market-2018/219914/#requestforsample

Global Adult Hearing Aids market 2018 principally focuses on the worldwide market but can be segregated on a regional level as well. Different regions included in this Adult Hearing Aids industry research report are North America Adult Hearing Aids market, Adult Hearing Aids industry of United States, Adult Hearing Aids Business of Southeast Asia, India, China and Japan Adult Hearing Aids market.

Adult Hearing Aids market distribution based on major types of products: Behind-the-ear (BTE) Hearing Aids, In-the-ear (ITE) Hearing Aids, Others
Adult Hearing Aids market distribution based on end user/consumer applications: Audiology Clinics, ENT Clinics, Others

The forecast period from 2018 to 2023 gives a concise plan of further actions to be taken to enhance the growth of Adult Hearing Aids industry. Further, the Adult Hearing Aids industry report accords exact figures of sales revenue of Adult Hearing Aids market, demand and supply ratio, import/export ratio and growth rate of Adult Hearing Aids trade in the form of pie-charts and tables. It gives a detailed company profile of Adult Hearing Aids industry top players along with their contact details, growth facets, annual revenue, sales margin, year of establishment, products offered and major sales region.

For any queries, give a free visit to: https://market.biz/report/global-adult-hearing-aids-market-2018/219914/#inquiry

Key Highlights of the Adult Hearing Aids Market Research Report:

  • The report summarizes the Adult Hearing Aids industry by stating basic product definition, product scope, demand and supply ratio, product cost and price, market overview, number of Adult Hearing Aids product applications.
  • Competitive landscape of all major players along with their business strategies, approaches, and current Adult Hearing Aids industry movements.
  • It elements the growth limiting factors, market opportunities, feasibility investment, restraints, Adult Hearing Aids trade driving forces and market risks.
  • It performs a comprehensive study of emerging players of Adult Hearing Aids business along with the existing ones.
  • It accomplishes primary and secondary interviews and research to estimate market size, top products and industrial partnerships of Adult Hearing Aids trade.

Global Adult Hearing Aids market 2018 research report ends by articulating research findings, results, data sources, sales channel, list of dealers, traders and distributors along with an appendix.

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